Question: Who Passed Indian Law?

Which is the first law in India?

Pre-Independence Law Commissions of IndiaFirst Pre-Independence Law CommissionChairmanLord MacaulayMembers(1) J.M.

Macleod, (2) G.W.

Anderson, and (3) F.

MilletReportsPenal Code (2 May 1837)Lex Loci (role and authority of English law in India) (31 October 1840)6 more rows.

Who is the father of international law?

Hamilton Vreeland’s Hugo Grotius: The Father of the Modern Science of International Law (1917) served to underline his status; the American Society of International Law holds an annual Grotius Lecture; and the Peace Palace library (The Hague) honors him as the “founder of the systematic modern doctrine of international …

Who is the father of Indian law?

Dr Neelakanta Ramakrishna Madhava MenonNR Madhava Menon was the person who introduced five years of integrated law degree course in India and established national law schools. Renowned academic and father of modern legal education in India, Dr Neelakanta Ramakrishna Madhava Menon died in Thiruvanathapuram on Wednesday.

Who wrote Indian law?

B. R. AmbedkarConstitution of IndiaAuthor(s)B. R. Ambedkar Chairman of the Drafting Committee Benegal Narsing Rau Constitutional Advisor to the Constituent Assembly Surendra Nath Mukherjee Chief Draftsman of the Constituent Assembly and other members of Constituent AssemblySignatories284 members of the Constituent Assembly17 more rows

What are the 4 types of law?

Terms in this set (4)Statutory law. Laws that are passed by congress or a state government.Common law. If there is not a statutory law covering a specific situation, a judge uses common sense to help decide how to rule.administrative law. Passed by government agencies. ( … Constitutional law.

Cohabitation in India, is legal.

Which is the oldest law in India?

These 8 Indian laws are so old that they still mention “Her majesty” and the “East India Company”Indian Treasure Trove Act, 1878. … The Indian Penal Code, 1860 (Section 497) … Ganges Tolls Act, 1867. … The Cattle-Trespass Act, 1871. … Glanders and Farcy Act of 1899. … The Bengal Bonded Warehouse Association Act, 1838.More items…•

Who is called Father of law?

Hugo GrotiusHe was a staunch critic of wars. Hugo Grotius is popularly known as Father of International Law. He introduced the concept of “reasoning” in International law, that is to say, he based international law on the principles governing natural law (based on reason).

Which countries have no laws?

UNBELIEVABLE ! 5 Places With No LawsAntarctica.International waters.As a matter of fact, the 12 nautical miles surrounding a country are regarded as national waters, and a further 12 miles out from that is a contiguous zone. … Ungoverned Afghanistan.one of the most dangerous areas in Afghanistan is a western territory known as Ungoverned Afghanistan.More items…

What are the laws in India?

India has a federal judicial system which is primarily based on mixed law i.e. based on parliamentary legislature, court laws, customary & religious laws as well….In Indian Judicial System there are four types of law.Criminal law. The Criminal law is enforced by the police. … Civil law. … Common law. … Statutory law.

Is It Illegal To Kiss in A Car? Couples have been arrested for kissing in a car in India, since according to the Indian Penal Code, Section 294, this could be considered “obscene” and cause “annoyance” to the public.

What are the 30 human rights in India?

Appendix 5: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (abbreviated)Article 1Right to EqualityArticle 2Freedom from DiscriminationArticle 3Right to Life, Liberty, Personal SecurityArticle 4Freedom from SlaveryArticle 5Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment25 more rows

What are illegal in India?

10 Things You Might Not Have Known Were Illegal In IndiaIn Delhi, it’s illegal to not alert the authorities by beating the drum when locusts attack. … If you find money lying around that’s more than 10 rupees, you’re committing a crime by not reporting it. … It’s illegal to fly a kite without a permit.More items…

Which British laws are still used in India?

In the above explanation, we read that there are so many laws like salt act, Indian penal code, Transfer of Property Act 1882 and Indian Police Act, 1861 are made to serve the motive of the British administration. But some laws are still adopted by the sovereign government of India.

How many acts are there in Indian law?

Law reforms After that 1,824 such laws were repealed by Narendra Modi government between May 2014 to December 2017, taking the total to 3,125.

What are the 7 types of law?

Terms in this set (7)The Constitution. supreme body of laws that govern our country.Statutory law. written or codified law such as legislative acts, declaring, commanding, or prohibiting something.Common or Case Law. … Civil Law (Private law) … Criminal Law. … Equity Law. … Administrative Law.

What are the 5 types of law?

In the United States, the law is derived from five sources: constitutional law, statutory law, treaties, administrative regulations, and the common law (which includes case law).

Can we sue police in India?

One of the forms of external mechanism for holding the police accountable for misconduct is through the courts, where complainants can directly sue police officers for alleged abuse of powers. The police can be held liable under criminal law, public law or through private tortious liability.

Answer. Explanation: The Legal Framework Order, 2002 was issued by Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf in August 2002. It provided for the general elections of 2002 and the revival of the 1973 Constitution of Pakistan, and added numerous amendments to the Constitution.

Under the Indian constitution, certain fundamental rights are available only to the citizens, namely: Right against discrimination on the grounds of religion, race, caste, sex or place of birth (Article 15); right to equality of opportunity in matter of public employment (Article 16); freedom of speech and expression, …

What are the 7 human rights in India?

Genesis. … Significance and characteristics. … Right to equality. … Right to freedom. … Right against exploitation. … Right to freedom of religion. … Right to life. … Cultural and educational rights.More items…